Symptoms to Discuss With Your Doctor During Pregnancy

Your body goes through a dramatic transformation during pregnancy. Regular prenatal appointments are essential to keep you and your growing baby healthy, and your appointments are the perfect time to discuss symptoms and questions you might have.

Some symptoms, like fatigue and morning sickness, are normal. But when do your symptoms require more immediate attention?

As an OB/GYN specializing in prenatal care, labor, and delivery, A. Michael Coppa, MD, understands that it’s not always easy to know when your pregnancy symptoms necessitate a call to the doctor. 

Our team is here for you. In general, we recommend talking about any symptoms that concern you, especially the following.

Abdominal pain or cramping

Mild abdominal pain or cramps are normal in your first trimester. During this time, the embryo implants in the lining of your uterus, which can cause light cramping and spotting. But you should discuss more intense abdominal pain or pain later in pregnancy.

Talk to Dr. Coppa about any symptoms related to pain. Abdominal pain, pelvic pain, or pain with urination aren’t normal and could indicate an infection or other pregnancy complication, like premature labor.

Vaginal bleeding

Along with mild abdominal pain, light spotting is common in the first trimester as the fetus begins growing. But vaginal bleeding after the first trimester — or heavy bleeding at any point — requires medical attention.

Call us if you have vaginal bleeding accompanied with pain, chills, or fever above 101 F. Mention other symptoms, like persistent diarrhea, with or without blood.

Sudden swelling, headache, or vision changes

Symptoms that come on strongly and suddenly necessitate a conversation with Dr. Coppa. Sudden swelling may occur in your hands, feet, or face. Vision changes can include blurry, double, or dim vision.

Swelling, headache, and/or vision changes could be signs of preeclampsia, which is the sudden onset of high blood pressure. Preeclampsia requires prompt medical care to preserve the health of you and your baby.

Fetal inactivity

Beginning around 28 weeks, you should be able to feel your baby’s movement fairly regularly. Every fetus is different, but you’ll learn what’s normal for your baby. 

Changes in your baby’s movements is important information to discuss with Dr. Coppa. If you notice fewer than 10 movements in about two hours, especially after having a snack or fruit juice, it could be a sign that something is wrong.

Feelings of depression

Open up about your mental well-being at your prenatal appointments. Dr. Coppa and our team can recommend resources to manage depression and anxiety during pregnancy. 

Trust your instincts when it comes to your health while you’re pregnant. If you ever have thoughts of harming yourself or your baby or you simply don’t feel like yourself, reach out for professional help right away.

Our team is here to help you have the safest possible pregnancy. Every pregnancy is different, so don’t hesitate to give us a call if you have any questions about your health. 

Trust your prenatal care to Dr. Coppa and our capable team. Request an appointment via our online tool or call the office nearest you. We’re located in Cranston, Smithfield, and Providence, Rhode Island.

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